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Kadori New Brand Ambassador -Michael Levine

Michael Levine is one of Canada's most sought after and in-demand stylists.
Michael Levine kadori brand ambassador

Michael Levine kadori brand

Training under and working along side some of the most iconic names in the hair industry, Michael was approached by Aveda in 1996 to lead their cutting and colouring education in western Canada, where he helped develop some of today's most widely used highlighting and cutting techniques. 
Opening Statik in 1998, Caramel in 2003, Tao in 2007 and Space in 2011 with his wife and celebrated hairdresser Liz Abreu, Michael has spent 16 years behind the chair making Vancouver women's hair more beautiful, as well as developing young talent through apprenticeships and now at Vancouver's premier hairdressing school the Vancouver Hairdressing Academy
Michael Levine was lucky enough to have been trained by, worked with and directly influenced by many incredible hairstylists, including Foster Eastman, Mo Muhktar, Gina Derry, David Adams, John Moroney, Antoinette Beenders, Nick Arrojo, Ana Karzis, Ted Gibson, Ray Civello, Tim Hartley, Harry Josh, Robert Cromeans, Van Council, Oscar Bond, DJ Muldoon, Takashi Kitimura, Charlie Price, Russel Mayes, Edwin Johnston and many, many others. But most importantly, Michael was influenced by his wife, business partner and master hairstylist Liz Abreu. Liz taught Michael the most important aspects of hairdressing and salon ownership: treating clients with respect and dignity and honouring the choice they make to spend their time in our salons.
In developing his philosophy on hair, Michael has alway tried to find the most direct way to the look he is after, often starting at the focal point and then working the rest of the hair around that key area.
With a strong vision for pretty hair, even when doing edgier looks or editorial projects, Michael's has worked on many of Canada's most recognizable faces. He prefers direction from his clients unless they are allowing him total creative freedom. His work is fast and always pretty.

How To Choose Professional Hair Dryer

If you own a hair dryer , you probably use it every day to take your locks from wet to dry enough to head out the door. And that's probably because you have no idea how to get the most out of this heat styling tool. It's never too late to learn, so we've put together a handy hair dryer guide with tips from celebrity hairstylist Matthew Collins and Brennen Demelo Kadori's brand ambassadors. Invest in wattage, but turn down the heat. It seems every new type of hair dryer is always touted as being hotter than the next. However, Matthew cautions against using extremely high heat settings, as they're probably not necessary for the home user. "A blow dryer that falls within the 1300 to 1875 watts range is great for anyone to use at home," says Matthew. "Personally, I like to feel my Kadori dryer blow the hair and feel like my tool is working. You can always turn down the heat, but still maintain power."
flyweight hair dryer

best light weight hair dryer

If you're someone who wants to set curls or simply blow dry your bangs, he recommends purchasing a kadori G.U.Y Hair Dryer with a 380G weight to reduce wrist strain and your blow dry time. Different types of hair require different levels of heat. The different heat levels should be adjusted to suit your hair texture and condition, according to Brennen . He explains, "The high heat is available for really thick or coarse hair, and to remove excessive moisture when the hair is really wet, but always remember to keep the dryer moving and never focus on one portion of the hair for too long. The low setting is perfect for thin or fragile hair. If your hair is only damp instead of wet, it is important to use the low heat setting to prevent over-drying." As far as that mysterious "cool shot" button, it seals the hair cuticle, setting the final look for long-lasting hold and adds shine. Brennen adds, "When your hair is about 80 percent dry, switch over to the cool shot. All your hair needs at this stage in drying is the finishing touches, and the cool shot adequately completes the drying and protects against overheating." Matthew believes the "cool shot" is also great to lock in a curl, or if you set your hair in curlers, it works to cool down your hair and lock in the waves as desired. Not all hair dryer types are created the same, so know which kind to use. "The ionic technology creates millions of negative ions, and what the ionic hair dryers help to do is break down the water molecule," says Matthew. "That allows the blow dryer to dry your hair much faster and that's because you're not only using heat and the force of the air flow, but you have this new technology that helps to break down water as well." The big problem with using ionic hair dryers, according to Matthew, is that people don't know when to stop. "Your hair is hot and you're running your brush through it and you don't take the time to notice when your hair is actually dry," he says. "So I think that a lot of people are over-drying their hair, especially around the face." Blondes mostly have this issue because they're getting their hairline highlighted all the time so that it looks natural and they don't have so much grow-out. best ionic dryerCeramic dryers emit non-damaging infrared heat, which Brennen states dries the hair gently for added heat protection. While tourmaline hair dryers emit infrared heat and negative ions, making the heat much gentler on the hair during styling for a shinier and less frizzy finish. It also enables the hair to endure much higher levels of heat without creating damage. Brennen prefers to use the Kadori LIA 2500X Hair Dryer, as this is an ionic dryer with a tourmaline-boosted ceramic system. The combination of all three elements provides the professional with the safest and quickest styling option. Meanwhile, Matthew  prefers to use the Kadori GUY 2300 Hair Dryer. Though the former is at a mid range price point, it blasts air up to 80mph and works great on thick hair. The right hair dryer attachment can help take the stress out of styling. While a lot of people don't use diffusers anymore, Matthew believes more than just curly-haired girls can benefit from this attachment. "I think it's great because instead of concentrating the heat in one area, it distributes it very broadly. A customer with even a light, natural wave whose looking to enhance it can use a diffuser to add body or bounce to their hair," he explains. Brennen suggests that those with curly and wavy hair textures use the diffuser at the low heat setting. This will help to lift the hair and release a gentle, indirect stream of warm air that is not overpowering so that your curls don’t become tangled, frizzy and unmanageable. Concentrators direct and focus the air output when you are styling to control frizz and style outcome. Brennen uses them to get straight or softly waved looks. His pro tip: Hold the concentrator closely to the hair, leaving a few inches in between. Use a rounded brush, pulling as tightly as reasonable to get the best results from the concentrator. No matter what type of hair dryer you use, remember to apply a heat protectant product first. "Protectant serums, lotions and sprays are the best way to ensure your hair stays protected during styling," says Brennen.